RDFizers

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The Open Semantic Framework is built around a Web services framework that serves RDF data. There are more than 100 converters of various record and data structure types to RDF. These converters — also sometimes known as translators or ‘RDFizers’ — generally take some input data records with varying formats or serializations and convert them to a form of RDF serialization (such as RDF/XML or N3), often with some ontology matching or characterizations.

This wealth of formats shows the robustness of the RDF data model to capture structure and data relationships from virtually any input form. This is what makes RDF so exciting as a canonical target for getting data to interoperate.

The largest source for RDFizers, which it calls Sponger cartridges, is from OpenLink Software in relation to its Virtuoso universal server. Most of its converters use XSLT stylesheets to translate to RDF, but the system has other conversion capabilities as well. Two additional OpenLink resources are a clickable diagram of converters and relationships with links and an online storehouse of available XSLT converters.

In addition, two other sources -- the W3C's Semantic Web wiki with converter listings and MIT's Simile program and listing of RDFizers -- have a rich set of listings.

Our current census, then, from these sources includes these converters:

URN handlers (in addition to IRI and URI):

  • DOI
  • LSID
  • OAI

RDF

  • Serialization formats:
    • irON
    • N3
    • RDF/XML
    • Turtle
  • Languages and ontologies:
    • AB Meta
    • Annotea
    • APML
    • AtomOWL
    • Bibliographic Ontology
    • Creative Commons
    • EXIF
    • FOAF
    • GeoNames
    • GoodRelations
    • Java
    • Javadoc
    • MARC/MODS
    • Meta Standards
    • Music Ontology
    • Natural Language
    • Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH)
    • Open Geospatial
    • OWL
    • SIOC
    • SIOCT
    • SKOS
    • UMBEL
    • vCard
    • XML
    • Others
  • (X)HTML pages
  • Embedded Microformats and GRDDL * (see note below):
    • DC
    • eRDF
    • geoURL
    • Google Base
    • hAudio
    • hCalendar
    • hCard
    • hListing
    • hResume
    • hReview
    • HR-XML
    • Ning
    • RDFa
    • relLicense
    • SVG
    • XBRL
    • XFN
    • xFolk
    • XR-XML
    • XSLT
  • Syndication Formats:
    • Atom
    • OPML
    • OCS
    • RSS 1.1
    • RSS 2.0
    • XBEL (for bookmarks)
  • REST-style Web service APIs:
    • Alchemy
    • Amazon
    • Apple
    • Best Buy
    • Calais
    • CNet
    • CrunchBase
    • Del.icio.us
    • Digg
    • Discogs
    • Disqus
    • eBay
    • Facebook
    • Flickr
    • Freebase (MQL)
    • FriendFeed
    • Garmin
    • Get Satisfaction
    • Google
    • Google Apps
    • Hoover's
    • HTTP (raw)
    • ISBN DB
    • Last.fm
    • Library Thing
    • Magnolia
    • Meetup
    • MusicBrainz
    • New York Times
    • New York Times Campaign Finance (NYTCF)
    • New York Times tags
    • Open Library
    • Open Social
    • Open Street
    • OpenLink (facets)
    • O'Reilly
    • Picasa
    • Radio Pop (BBC)
    • Rhapsody
    • Salesforce
    • Slideshare
    • Slidy
    • Technorati
    • Tesco
    • They Work For You
    • Twine
    • Twitter
    • Weather
    • Wikipedia
    • World Bank
    • Yahoo! BOSS
    • Yahoo! Finance
    • Yahoo! Maps
    • Yahoo! Weather
    • Yelp
    • YouTube
    • Zemanta
    • Zillow
  • Other Web service frameworks:
    • BPEL
    • WSDL
    • XBRL
    • XBEL
  • Data exchange formats:
    • iCalendar
    • LDIF
    • vCalendar
    • vCard
  • Virtuoso VADs
  • OpenLink license files
  • Third party metadata extraction frameworks:
  • Miscellaneous and other related converters:
  • GRDDL (Gleaning Resource Descriptions from Dialects of Languages) is a W3C markup format for getting RDF data out of XML and XHTML documents using explicitly associated transformation algorithms, typically represented in XSLT GRDDL accomodates a wide variety of dialects (see one listing) and can be combined with arbitrary transformation mechanisms (though currently mostly based on XSLTs).